HR-Giger-paints-1H. R. Giger (1940–2014) is recognized as one of the world’s foremost artists of Fantastic Realism. Born in 1940 to a chemist’s family in Chur, Switzerland, he moved in 1962 to Zurich, where he studied architecture and industrial design at the School of Applied Arts. By 1964 he was producing his first artworks, mostly ink drawings and oil paintings, resulting in his first solo exhibition in 1966, followed by the publication and world-wide distribution of his first poster edition in 1969. Shortly after, he discovered the airbrush and, along with it, his own unique freehand painting style, leading to the creation of many of his most well known works, the surrealistic Biomechanical dreamscapes, which formed the cornerstone of his fame. To date, more than 20 books have been published about Giger’s art.    – Read More of his Bio at www.hrgiger.com

Besides Giger’s extraordinary canvases and drawings he also became an innovative force in films as a designer of sets, creatures and costumes, and one could go as far to say, the overall vision of a film. The Alien movies are a perfect example of his vision becoming the heartbeat of a production.

Alien

Necronomicon

NecronomiconGiger’s most famous book, Necronomicon, published in 1977, served as the visual inspiration for director Ridley Scott’s film Alien, Giger’s first high-profile film assignment, which earned him the 1980 Oscar for the Best Achievement in Visual Effects for his designs of the film’s title character, including all the stages of its lifecycle, plus the film’s extraterrestrial environments.

The book was originally published by Sphinx Verlag and was republished in 1993 by Morpheus International. A subsequent collection of his images followed as H. R. Giger’s Necronomicon 2, printed in 1985 by Edition C of Switzerland. A startling milestone on the darkly lit road once traveled by the likes of Bosch, Brueghel, Lovecraft, Poe and Kafka. Giger’s remarkable book of the dead gives us some of the most powerful images ever an artist drew from the well of the imagination.

Giger’s other well-known film work includes his designs for Poltergeist II, Alien3 and Species, as well as the legendary unmade film, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Dune.

Filmography

Dune (designs for unproduced Alejandro Jodorowsky adaptation of the Frank Herbert novel; the movie Dune was later made in an adaptation by David Lynch.)

Alien (designed, among other things, the Alien creature, “The Derelict” and the “Space Jockey”)

Aliens (credited for the creation of the creature only)

Alien 3 (designed the dog-like Alien bodyshape, plus a number of unused concepts, many mentioned on the special features disc of Alien 3, despite not being credited in the movie theater version)

Alien: Resurrection (credited for the creation of the creature only)

Poltergeist II: The Other Side

Killer Condom

Species (designed Sil, and the Ghost Train in a dream sequence)

Batman Forever (designed radically different envisioning of the Batmobile; design was not used in the film)

Future-Kill (designed artwork for the movie poster)

Tokyo: The Last Megalopolis (creature designs)

Prometheus (the film includes “The Derelict” spacecraft and the “Space Jockey” designs from the first Alien film, as well as a “Temple” design from the failed Jodorowsky Dune project and original extraterrestrial murals created exclusively for Prometheus, based in conceptual art from Alien. Unlike Alien: Resurrection, the Prometheus film credited H. R. Giger with the original designs).